The federal election is over, and the Green Party of Canada now holds more seats in government than they ever have. But, that is only three seats.
Following an election that featured climate change as a prominent issue, you’d think 2019 would be the year the Green Party would see a large breakthrough. I think this result has shown this is about as far as current leader Elizabeth May can take the party, and it’s time for the Green Party to seek out a new leader.
May has been the Green Party’s leader since 2006, and is the longest serving party leader of the major federal parties in Canada. While her dedication to helming the party is admirable, it just might be time to find a new voice to lead the party into the next election, as the 2019 election result has proven her leadership has only led to very small gains.
People who are most likely to vote for the Greens tend to, for the most part, be younger voters, and at 65 years of age, I don’t think May is really a person this base can relate to anymore. It would make sense for the Green Party to name a younger leader, someone young voters could both be excited about and could relate to.
A new leader could bring new ideas on how to brand the party, so that it has something that appeals to every voter demographic.
At the federal and provincial levels, there is proof that a new leader can do wonders for a party’s fate. Just look at how Justin Trudeau led the Liberals in 2015 from third party status to a majority government, or how Doug Ford led the Ontario Conservatives to victory in last year’s provincial election.
To be clear though, I’m not saying May should leave federal politics entirely. In fact, there would probably be value in her staying on to mentor the new leader. All I’m saying is this party needs a fresh new voice in the near future if they want to see larger election successes going forward.
Elizabeth May has done what she could to grow the Green Party, and should be proud of her accom-plishments. But, it is time for change, time to bring in a new voice sooner rather than later.