I’d first like to start with a story I heard, about a 100-year-old female bodybuilder named Edith Murway-Traina. Yes, you heard me right! She started Weight training at 91 years of age.


Maybe you’re under the impression that age dictates strength. With this story, it’s obvious, muscles know no age. The human body merely responds to what you present it with.


Science says you lose muscle as you get older. Does that mean strength training is even more imperative as you age? I’m not suggesting you become a bodybuilder. But wouldn’t it be nice to enjoy a good quality of life, being able to enjoy the activities you love? The phrase, “if you don’t use it, you lose it,” comes to mind.


Let’s look into the process of developing muscle mass.


When you push weight, the muscle fibre tears. You’re therefore stressing the muscle beyond what it’s capable of. It is during rest the muscle repairs and becomes stronger and tighter. Science says, changes occur after twelve weeks of consistent training. So, a person must consistently stress the muscle in order to develop strength. The average beginner may consider three days a week, starting with 30 to 45 minutes of resistance training, each time.


Over the years, the rate of developing muscle may slow down, but this doesn’t mean you cannot develop strength as you age. It takes consistency, on your part, and a change in your exercise program every twelve weeks to stimulate muscle development. Your body only responds to what you present it with Use it, don’t lose it!